Richard Mulholland
  • SPEAKER
    • Richard kicked off his career as a rock n roll roadie, operating lights for bands such as Iron Maiden and Def Leppard. From there he started SA's largest presentation firm, Missing Link and co-founded 21Tanks, SA's first perspective lab.

      Richard is a highly regarded speaker. When not addressing many of South Africa's top corporations, he guest lectures on courses for The Cape Graduate School of Business (GSB), and the Gordon Institute of Business Science (GIBS).

      As well as blogging on richmulholland.com, Richard is a columnist for Longevity and Destiny Man magazines.

      He has a tattoo of your Mum on his left bum cheek...!

  • ENTREPRENEUR
    • Rich started and grew Missing Link to be the largest Presentation firm in South Africa. Never one to be satisfied with stagnation, Rich has made use of his advanced years to accomplish a fair amount. He bred again, tattooed his back, owns two houses, and now rides a Vespa (after failing his learner’s…). They grow up so fast… He also co-founded our sister company – 21Tanks!
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  • FOLLOW ME
  • TESTIMONIALS
  • CONTACT
    • E-mail rich at missinglink dot co dot za
    • tel +27 (0) 11 467 8160
    • mobile +27 (0) 83 273 9889
    • Skype richardmulholland

Still learning...!

Reclaim yourself, question everything...

The Knight and the Dragon in a “Scott Almes” Deathmatch

So as you may know I’m something of a board game fan. I’m also something of a Kickstarter fan. Well two of my favourite game publishers this week launched games by one of my very favourite game designers – Scott Almes.

deathmatch.jpg

It’s the Tasty Minstrel Games dragon vs the Gamelyn Games knight in a fight for ultimate funding.

Both parties are armed with the same weapon, a Scott Almes game. Both are running one month campaigns with a $15k goal.

The dragon took first blood by controlling the Harbour, but it is the knight that will get the final strike with his Tiny Epic Defenders:

Who will prevail! Will it be the fierce dragon? Or the brave knight?

The dragon, or the knight?

  
pollcode.com free polls

Take fate into your hands on kickstarter now!

Feel free to find me, the knight, the dragon, and the weapon on twitter to join the conversation .

June 20, 2014 at 6:10 pm | 3 comments

No, actually, content isn’t everything.

If you’ve been to any tech/web/online/marketing conferences in the last few years, you would have no doubt been exposed to a speaker cry, “Content is king!” while fist-pumping the air.

They may even have been right too.

They’re just not anymore.

Up until very recently, the price of diamonds had been controlled by De Beers, it wasn’t difficult, it was simply a case of understanding the law of supply and demand then managing your stock accordingly – De Beers of course quite infamously stockpiling a crazy amount of diamonds, keeping the demand (and price) just the way they like it. High.

Similarly, for christmas I got a great board game called Planet Steam, in it you have to mine resources in a steam punk universe and sell it. The trick is though, every time you sell something, the price of that commodity goes down. It’s a fun game, and easy to explain – people understand this principle.

Planet-Steam-Web.jpg

Except, that is, when it comes to content.

No, when it comes to content more, your digital and content agencies would have you believe, actually does mean more. They’re wrong.

In the laws of supply and demand, the content market is so unbelievably saturated that the value of the commodity called content is close to zero. We’re hardly even willing to spend our attention on it. Most of us just scan the bold stuff and leave it at that.

economics_lesson_demand_exceeds_supply-1.png

(…you can’t give your audience more time)

So why am I telling you this? Because yesterday I was having lunch with a mate who was discussing the content strategy for a chocolate bar. A chocolate bar?! Seriously, I like a Twix as much as the next guy, but for goodness sake, the value of a Twix comes in the eating, not the reading. And if the truth be told, no one cares.

The irony, of course, is that I’m writing this post and adding to the clutter. The difference is that I only write the stuff that I really really feel strongly about, and I keep those moments few and far between.

Don’t go after more. Go after less (to the power of more).

Anyway, I’m rambling, I’ll shut the fuck up.

I suggest you do too…!

March 7, 2014 at 2:52 pm | 8 comments

How not to do customer loyalty, a lesson from MTN

Before I start I’d like to say that I can’t stand what a whiney culture we’ve become. Consumers use social media bully tactics to force their hand and brands are judged in the court of public opinion. As such I have intentionally avoided taking this online. It is only now, weeks after it all started, that I’ve given up hope and decided to relay the story.

So a few months ago I was inducted into MTN’s loyalty programme – Prestige. Eight months later, I’m out again. Have a look through this short preso to understand what went down (there’s some emails here, full screen will be best).

That’s 8-months from cradle-to-grave. Nice.

brent.jpg

Actually, that’s not true. It’s actually 18-years. I received my first phone on my 21st birthday (a fact that my 10-year old son struggles to comprehend).

The upside of course is that I’m a speaker on customer service, material like this is worth far more than the cost of a new iPhone 5s – a fact that I mentioned when I eventually forced my way into an email conversation.

As of this writing, I still have not received a single bit of contact directly.

So what’s the lesson? The lesson is simple, this loyalty thing, it’s about people. MTN has forgotten that, they’ve made it about spreadsheets. The irony here is that had they just never bothered to sign me up in the first place, we all would have been a lot better off.

In utility business, the customer doesn’t expect the lights to be shot out, if the service sold to us works, we’re happy and quiet. Happy and quiet means loyal. MTN’s mistake is that they tried to get fancy here (it should be noted that the programme itself is run by a “service” provider – PLP).

I guess at least they were right about one thing (thanks Ian), the share is indeed mightier than than the like, so if you don’t like this…

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Well done guys, you’ve managed to properly fuck-up 18 good years…!

November 21, 2013 at 10:56 pm | 36 comments

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